Affiliate Marketing Without A Website

Having your own website to promote your affiliate products is a good option. But it is not necessary. There are many methods available that can be used to do your affiliate marketing business. The list is long, but the most important methods are email marketing, writing articles to e-groups, joining online discussions etc. Let us discuss some important methods that can be used to promote your affiliate products without having your own website.

Email Marketing

In this method you can promote your affiliate links and you don’t need your own website. People can click on your affiliate links present in your emails and can go directly to the merchant website to purchase the products.

Your email should contain the introduction about the product you are promoting and your affiliate links. Try to make your emails interesting and brief.

Try to expand your contact list. Use as many methods as you can to grab the email addresses of new people. Use online forums, chat forums etc to make new friends. Your email list must contain a few hundred contacts, at least. But don’t spam. Don’t send emails to the people who don’t know about you or who don’t want to receive your emails. Otherwise they will just block your emails and you will lose your contacts. As I said, your emails should be interesting to get the reader’s attention.

Offline Promotion

You can use the offline methods of promotion, like the classified ads, flyers etc. The best choice is the classified ads because its exposure is largest.

Writing free e-books

It is similar to email marketing. But in this method you will write the informative and interesting e-books and will send to the people via their email address. These e-books should be easy to read and helpful for their readers. The topics should be related to your affiliate products so that you can recommend the products in the body of e-books. Alternatively you can add a brief note about your affiliate products and affiliate links for promotion. If the readers like your e-book, they may visit the merchant website and make a purchase.

Writing in Forums

Search for some forums, at least three, that are related to your product and have high page rank. Register on these forums and start some discussion in the forum where maximum people are involved. Just post your questions there or answer some questions of other members. But don’t add any promotion text in the body of your posts. You are allowed to put your signature at the end of your post. Here you can write you name and your affiliate links.

When you become an active member of this forum then you may get some traffic from these forums to your merchant website through your affiliate links. This will ultimately result in more sales of the products you are promoting.

Writing Articles

You can write articles and publish them in the free article directories. You can embed your affiliate links in the text of your articles. If your articles are well formatted, informative and the article directory has large traffic then you can expect some good traffic to your affiliate links. And you know that more traffic on your affiliate links will result in more sales through your affiliate links.

Conclusion

The use of a website to promote your affiliate products is a good idea but it is not necessary. You can use the alternate methods to promote your affiliate products and links. The most popular among these methods are email marketing, writing to forums, article writing and offline promotion like classified ads. The main idea is that instead of promoting your website you will directly promote your affiliate links and people will directly go to the merchant website by clicking your affiliate links to purchase the products. This way you do not have to pay extra for your website creation and maintenance.

How Great Market Research Increases Sales!

Increasingly, “Location, Location, Location” is being replaced by “Customer, Customer, Customer.”

This doesn’t come as a surprise to any savvy business person: What you know about your customers will help you serve them better and encourage them to spread the word about the value of your products and services.

However, how you go about learning as much as possible about current and potential customers is the true key to sustained success, especially as small businesses find themselves vying with national brands locating here or marketing via the web.

Sure, you can learn a lot through face-to-face discussions. Nevertheless, in 2008, some of the same detailed market analysis tools used by the biggest companies in the world are accessible to you.

Whether your business is in retail, restaurant, banking, insurance, financial services, or other businesses that services homeowners; you have a need to know your customer’s buying habits and lifestyles. Why? It helps drive sale of the products and services in your business.

Understanding which customers are most likely to purchase your products and services helps you target potential buyers more cost-effectively. Furthermore, by knowing where these customers live, you can make location-based decisions on your stores, restaurants, and branch locations.

When you shop, does the sales clerk ask for your zip code or telephone number? Do you use loyalty cards, store credit cards, charge cards? If so, these techniques provide the data necessary to develop customer profiles.

Businesses increasingly are utilizing location-based technology, demographic studies, traffic patterns, sales, homeowner location, and other data to describe customer lifestyles and buying habits (psychographics), identify ideal store locations, determine high and low volume product categories, locate their competition, estimate potential sales volume, and track average daily traffic volume. The same opportunities are available to the smallest business, due to continuous technology advances.

The use of decision support tools directly assists larger companies to understand their current location dynamics and markets that lead to their success, and identify where else these dynamics exist to support additional growth strategies.

It is not by chance that Home Depot, Chili’s Restaurants, Ben & Jerry’s, Wal-Mart, Pier One, Outback Steakhouse and other national brands are locating in your communities. Their decisions to build a store, hire and train staff, purchase inventory, and advertise in specific ways using these decision-support tools substantially reduces the associated investment risks.

They know who their best customers are; where they live; what the sales potential is from each customer; and which locations can maximize their investment. Increasingly, “Location, Location, Location” is being replaced by “Customer, Customer, Customer.”

Different businesses develop different concepts. A good location for one retailer may not be the same for another. Why? Location value is determined by the customers in that trade area. Customer concentrations drive the location decision!

Market researchers have established lifestyle segmentation systems that encompass up to 72 clusters or divisions based on life stage, demographics, income, purchasing habits and other unique characteristics of residents in specific neighborhoods.

Neighborhoods and households are labeled. These clusters and divisions are critical, since they are statistically likely to act in similar, predictable ways. Most stores service several predominant clusters or divisions. Researchers have categorized the over 111 million households in the U.S. into these segmentation systems.

What is your business concept’s “trade area?” You need to know how much time a typical customer is willing to spend to drive to your business. “Drive time” is often a product of the cost of the good or service. Consumers will drive further to purchase a bedroom set than they would to buy groceries. Today, location-based technology can cost-effectively produce a polygon-shaped map of your “drive time trade area.”

Once you know your dominant customer segments and your model trade area, you can graphically plot the major and minor clusters within each. Then, you can augment this with:

Daily traffic counts by your site location,
Competitor location(s),
Trade area product demand,
Total households in the trade area, and
Total population and other demographic data.
You also can determine whether an additional location for your store in the trade area would cannibalize (steal sales from) your existing location.

Data to help you market and advertise cost effectively

Want to market and advertise to the households in this trade area?

Consider a marketing message that “fits” the lifestyles and buying habits of your predominant segment profiles – using print, radio, television, or direct mail. Today, you can target direct mail only to specific households that are most likely to purchase your products and services, saving money on wasted eyes bought in a mass media campaign.

Second-home owners, for example, purchase much differently than full-time residents.

Want to determine if a potential, new location will be successful?

Develop a customer profile model, a model of your successful trade area, and an analysis of alternative sites to determine if these sites have the critical factors (profitability analysis, penetration and product performance, competitor location, cannibalization analysis) necessary for a successful location.

Want to know if your existing product and service mix is maximizing your current locations?

Analyze consumer-spending estimates for your trade area’s demand for specific products and services in 20 major categories and hundreds of individual items. These categories and items are indexed to national averages for each segment cluster or division and can help you understand why certain products and services are disappearing from the shelves and why other products are gathering too much dust.

How do you start this analysis?

If you are not yet collecting customer-specific information (street address is the ideal), start collecting it.
Analyze your sales and inventory data, as well as total cost of goods sold, to determine high and low sales categories.
Locate where your competition is.
Consider utilizing location, segmentation, and market analysis to increase your competitive edge.
Remember, technology advances have made this process very affordable for the small, local, or regional service business. You can compete effectively with the chains.

Will the Election Impact Markets and Investments?

What drives the stock market? Quite often, it is fundamental factors such as the strength of the economy and its impact on corporate profits. At other times it is affected, at least in the short term, by external factors that can upend investor expectations and drive markets in a positive or negative direction.

One of the most obvious external factors that might come into play for markets this year is the upcoming presidential election. This is the kind of election year that has some built-in market uncertainty. It marks the end of the second term for President Barack Obama, which means that a new occupant will sit in the Oval Office in January 2017. Regardless of who wins, the leadership transition will likely result in some policy changes in the near future.

Dealing with uncertainty

This election season has been marked by unusual twists. In the Democratic Party, Hillary Clinton, a longtime party stalwart faced a surprisingly difficult challenge before earning the nomination for the chance to become the country’s first woman president. On the Republican side, Donald Trump, a celebrity newcomer to the party captured the nomination, overcoming a number of more experienced politicians.

Even without these twists, it isn’t uncommon for the stock market to exhibit a degree of volatility in the run-up to an election, at least until the likely outcome is clearer. One of the key issues that could affect markets is the possibility that control of the White House could change to a different party. According to an analysis by the Ameriprise Investment Research Group, the potential for such a change tends to increase stock market volatility. This can be particularly true in the final weeks leading up to the election. Investors should be prepared for circumstances where the “noise” generated by the campaign contributes to market fluctuations.

Is history a guide?

Other data may provide clues as to what to expect in the markets. According to Standard & Poor’s, since 1900, U.S. stocks have declined by an average of 1.2 percent in the eighth year of a presidential term. There are two points of caution with this statistic:

1. There are a limited number of times when this circumstance has occurred.

2. The last time it happened, in 2008, we were in the midst of the Great Recession. The markets were down 41 percent that year, which dramatically changed the average return for this specific measurement.

What may be a more important consideration for investors than who is the new president is whether we enter the election and post-election season with a great deal of uncertainty about policy direction.

The impact on specific market sectors

Although it’s speculative to try and predict the outcome of the election and all of the policy implications each party would impose, the result of the election is likely to influence key industries. Among the sectors of the market that could be affected in different ways are:

• Healthcare – what is the future of the Affordable Care Act and the general direction of health insurance coverage in the U.S.?

• Energy – will production of fossil fuels continue to be encouraged or will greater emphasis be put on alternative energy sources?

• Security – how will the defense budget be affected given the increased focus on global security?

It’s about more than the president

It’s true that our president has tremendous influence in the direction our country takes. However, it’s important to remember that there are many others who play a role in making policy that can affect the investment environment. These include members of Congress (many who are also up for election this year), local and state legislators, Federal regulators and other officials. For example, the Federal Reserve controls monetary policy, which includes monitoring inflation and the Federal interest rates. Politicians have limited to no influence over policy decisions made by the Fed.

Also keep in mind that the presidential election doesn’t have the same impact over U.S. markets as it once did. External events, many of which are overseas, increasingly affect the markets, and are often out of the control of elected officials. These events include natural disasters, terrorist attacks, financial crises and the financial results of publicly held companies.

What this means for your finances

While it’s natural to think about the impact of the election on your investments, it’s only one factor. Stay attuned to the bigger picture of your long-term goals. Review your portfolio diversification and risk tolerance with a financial advisor for an objective perspective on your financial situation.